Will basic smartphones open up the developing world?

Nokia 6020

Nokia 6020 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As the latest smartphone becomes the de facto requirement for Mobile users in Europe and the US, it would be pretty easy to think the smartphone is the dominant phone throughout the world. Think again. While the UK and US struggle under mountains of debt and an uncertain economic future, parts of the developing world are making huge strides in connectivity and communication being driven by, you guessed it, the good old feature phone.

In India, mobile adoption is high in both towns and cities and offers a way of reaching parts of the country that are normally untouched. Indeed, Indians spend more time on their mobile device than on any other medium. Yes, this does mean opportunities for advertisers however examples of how mobile can advance peoples’ every days lives are plentiful. Recently, a funny telephone game has gone viral in Pakistan which allows illiterate and poorly-educated people to find out about jobs and telephone-based services. In Africa, Mobile devices are being used to warn people of floods, natural disasters and outbreaks of diseases that could affect both people and livestock. Kenya’s iCow offers farmers the opportunity to register their cow through a text and receive regular updates on gestation periods and when cows are most likely to mate. M-PESA, originally launched in Africa and newly launched in parts of India, gives the “unbanked” access to mobile banking services. This cheap, mass-communication device will continue to help people throughout the developing world.

It is the feature phone not the smartphone, that is driving this and global shipments of feature phones still far outstrip smartphones. The latest Android or Apple device is far too expensive for the majority of people in developing countries, and cheaper alternatives offer the basic services that people require. As mobile shipments continue to steer towards the developing world, we are likely to see companies turn their attention that way and come up with cheaper alternatives. Although there will always be an aspirational facet to owning a premium smartphone, and countries with burgeoning middle classes such as India and China will drive this, the large tech companies will need to produce cheaper alternatives to increase their uptake.

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One thought on “Will basic smartphones open up the developing world?

  1. Pingback: smartphone user? | the drilling people

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